Team

Core Team

Ingvild Bode

Principal Investigator

Areas of expertise

Norm emergence and change | Use of force | United Nations | Peacekeeping | Practice theories in International Relations

Ingvild Bode

Principal Investigator

Areas of expertise
Norm emergence and change | Use of force | United Nations | Peacekeeping | Practice theories in International Relations

Dr Ingvild Bode is Associate Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern Denmark. Previously, she was Senior Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Kent, Canterbury (2015-2020) and a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) International Research Fellow (postdoc) with joined affiliation at United Nations University and the University of Tokyo (2013-2015). She has also lectured at Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany (2008-2012), where she was a research fellow and completed her PhD in 2013.  

Ingvild’s research agenda covers the area of peace and security, with a theoretical focus combining practice theories and constructivist International Relations. She is principally interested in analysing processes of policy and normative change, especially in the areas of weaponised Artificial Intelligence, the use of force, United Nations peacekeeping, and more general dynamics of the UN Security Council. 

Ingvild has published extensively in these areas, including in journals such as the European Journal of International Relations, Review of International Studies, Global Governance, and International Studies Review. She is the author of Individual Agency and Policy Change at the United Nations  (Routledge, 2015) and the co-author of Governing the Use-of-Force: The Post-9/11 US Challenge on International Law (Palgrave, 2014, with Aiden Warren). 

Ingvild is Associate Editor of Global Society and a member of the editorial board of Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations.

AutoNorms research focus

Within the AutoNorms project, Ingvild Bode develops the analytical framework combining critical norm research and practice theories. She also focuses on the transnational political debate on weaponised AI (chiefly at the GGE), works on the case of Japan and provides input to all other country cases. She is the PhD supervisor of Anna Nadibaidze.  

Hendrik Huelss​

Senior Researcher​

Areas of expertise

Norms | Governmentality | EU external relations | Poststructuralist and constructivist IR Theory

Hendrik Huelss

Senior Researcher

Areas of expertise
Norms | Governmentality | EU external relations | Poststructuralist/constructivist IR Theory

Dr Hendrik Huelss is Assistant Professor at the Center for War Studies, Department of Political Science and Public Management, University of Southern Denmark. From 2016 to 2020, he was Post-Doctoral Researcher at the School for Politics and International Relations, University of Kent. Hendrik holds a PhD in political science from the University of Copenhagen.

In his work, his research combines an interest in norms in International Relations with perspectives on technologies in politics. His primary theoretical background is Foucault’s governmentality, but he is broadly interested in constructivist/poststructural works in IR in the fields of security studies, European Union external relations, as well as global governing and IR theory in general.

Hendrik has published on these research themes in journals such as International Political SociologyInternational TheoryJournal of International Relations and Development, and Review of International Studies. He is also co-author of Autonomous Weapons Systems and International Norms (McGill-Queen’s University Press, forthcoming 2021 with Ingvild Bode). 

AutoNorms research focus

Within the AutoNorms project, Hendrik Huelss contributes to the development of the analytical framework combining critical norm research in IR with viewpoints on governmentality and practices. He also focuses on the project case study of the USA and on the question how norms on AWS emerge and transform across four domains of practices (i.e. military, transnational political, dual-use and popular imagination).

Guangyu Qiao-Franco

Senior Researcher

Areas of expertise

Norm diffusionPolicy transferInternational organisationsUse of forceNon-traditional security issuesChina studiesSoutheast Asia studies

Guangyu Qiao-Franco

Senior Researcher

Areas of expertise
Norm diffusionPolicy transferInternational organisationsUse of forceNon-traditional security issuesChina studiesSoutheast Asia studies

Dr Guangyu (Karin) Qiao-Franco is Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Political Science and Public Administration, University of Southern Denmark. Previously, she was head tutor of political science and an early career researcher at the University of Melbourne (2019-2021). She holds a PhD degree in international relations from the University of Melbourne.

Guangyu has teaching experience through tutoring, leading seminars and lecturing at the University of Melbourne and Fudan University. She has taught various subjects, mainly in the areas of international relations, transnational crimes, Asian studies, and research methodologies. She has also solo-supervised a Masters student thesis on anti-corruption reforms in Indonesia at the University of Melbourne (2019-2020).

Her research interests include policy transfer, norm diffusion, international organisationsChina studies, ASEAN regional governance, use of force (especially surrounding the development of autonomous weapons systems),and non-traditional security issues (such as climate change and human trafficking). Her recent work appears in The Pacific Review, International Relations of the Asia-Pacific and Policy StudiesShe is the author of the bookPromoting UN-ASEAN Coordination: Policy Transfer and Regional Cooperation Against Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia,to be published by Edward Elgar.  

AutoNorms research focus

Within the AutoNorms project, Guangyu (Karin) Qiao-Franco focuses on the case of China. She is exploring new theoretical approaches such as synthesising practice theories, constructivist international relations theories, and assemblage thinking to understand how norms on AWS manifest and transform across four domains of practices (i.e. military, transnational political, dual-use and popular imagination) in China. She will also assess the impact of China’s AWS positions on international policy development in this context.

Anna Nadibaidze

PhD Researcher

Areas of expertise

European and international security | International organisations | Russia/Eurasia | Discourse analysis | Identity in IR

Anna Nadibaidze

PhD Researcher

Areas of expertise

European and international security | International organisations | Russia/Eurasia | Discourse analysis | Identity in IR

Anna Nadibaidze is a PhD Student at the Center for War Studies and the Department of Political Science and Public Management, University of Southern Denmark. She holds an MSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and a BA in Political Science from McGill University. Her research interests include European and international security, emerging technologies such as militarised AI, EU-Russia relations, as well as the role of identity and discourse in foreign policy.

Previously, Anna has worked in media, think tanks, and international organisations. She has also written a weekly column about Russian politics for the BMB Russia newsletter (2018-2021). Her analytical and opinion pieces have been published by various media outlets, such as EUObserver and The Spectator. Anna has experience giving interviews to international newspapers and broadcasters, including the BBC, CNN, France 24, and Al Jazeera.

AutoNorms research focus

Within the AutoNorms project, Anna Nadibaidze focuses on the case of Russia. Her PhD research, supervised by Ingvild Bode and Vincent Keating, examines the relationship between the development of weaponised AI and Russian state identity through a practice-based approach. She also observes and analyses how AWS practices manifest and transform within four contexts (military, transnational political, dual-use and popular imagination) in Russia.

Tom Watts

Researcher

Areas of expertise
American foreign and security policy | Remote warfare | Lethal autonomous weapons systems 

Tom Watts

Researcher

Areas of expertise
American foreign and security policy | Remote warfare | Lethal autonomous weapons systems 

Dr Tom Watts is currently a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at the University of Hertfordshire. Previously, he was a Teaching Fellow in War and Security at Royal Holloway, University of London (2018-2020) and a Graduate Teaching Assistant at the University of Kent (2014-2018). Tom graduated with a PhD in International Relations at the University of Kent in 2019. 

Tom’s research interests are in the field of International Security with a particular focus on American foreign policy, “remote warfare” and lethal autonomous weapons systems. His research has been published with GeopoliticsGlobal Affairs, the Bulletin of the Atomic ScientistsDrone Wars UK, and the Oxford Research Group.

AutoNorms research focus

Tom works part-time on the Autonorms project. He is responsible for creating open-source catalogues of the integration of automated and autonomous features into the critical functions of various weapon systems. This includes loitering munitions, which will form a major part of his work on the project. Through his research specializations in American foreign policy and the character of contemporary political, he also makes a wider contribution to the Autonorms project.

Collaborators

Dr Luciano Vaz-Ferreira, Professor at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Brazil

Project Associates

Dr Trine Flockhart, Professor, CWS, Denmark

Dr Amelie Theussen, Assistant Professor, CWS, Denmark

Dr Heigo Sato, Professor, Institute of World Studies, Takushoku University, Japan

Dr Hirofumi Tosaki, Center for Disarmament, Science and Technology; Japan Institute of International Affairs, Japan